mymodernmet:

London-based photographer and digital artist Nikita Gill transports viewers to a fantastical world in her dreamy series A Quiet Day in Wonderland.

(via pbsarts)

slither-and-scales:


Future in my hands by Chris Johnson

slither-and-scales:

Future in my hands by 

(via drxgonfly)


Owl Sunset | Ingrid Vekemans
10bullets:

Plumage by Steveprice

One of the hardest lifey lessons I have ever learned is I cannot save people from themselves. I can’t, and I am no longer sorry about this fact.

Me
musts:

© Erin Gardner { buy prints }
mstrkrftz:

Waves by Nikos Tzwrtzatos
williamdaniel:

Above is the world’s smallest known vertebrate, Paedophryne amanuensis. Researchers found the frog in 2010 in southern Papua New Guinea and just announced the discovery yesterday. From National Geographic:

Scientists locate the teensy animals by listening for their calls and trying to zero in on the sources of the sounds—no mean feat, since the high pitch of the calls make their sources especially hard for human hearing to locate.
(Louisiana State University biologist Christopher) Austin and graduate student Eric Rittmeyer tried four times to find the frogs before exasperatedly grabbing a big handful of leaf litter and putting it in a plastic bag.
The scientists then combed through the contents until “eventually we saw this tiny thing hop off one of the leaves,” Austin said.

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williamdaniel:

Above is the world’s smallest known vertebrate, Paedophryne amanuensis. Researchers found the frog in 2010 in southern Papua New Guinea and just announced the discovery yesterday. From National Geographic:

Scientists locate the teensy animals by listening for their calls and trying to zero in on the sources of the sounds—no mean feat, since the high pitch of the calls make their sources especially hard for human hearing to locate.

(Louisiana State University biologist Christopher) Austin and graduate student Eric Rittmeyer tried four times to find the frogs before exasperatedly grabbing a big handful of leaf litter and putting it in a plastic bag.

The scientists then combed through the contents until “eventually we saw this tiny thing hop off one of the leaves,” Austin said.